Friday, 8 March 2013

Supervisor



A supervisor, foreperson, overseer, cell coach, facilitator, or area coordinator is a manager in a position of trust in business.  The US Bureau of Census has four hundred titles under the supervisor classification. An employee is a supervisor if he has the power and authority to do the following actions.

Be held responsible for the work and actions of other employees. If an employee cannot do the above, legally he or she is probably not a supervisor, but in some other category, such as lead hand. A supervisor is first and foremost an overseer whose main responsibility is to ensure that a group of subordinates get out the assigned amount of production, when they are supposed to do it and within acceptable levels of quality, costs and safety.

A supervisor is responsible for the productivity and actions of a small group of employees. The supervisor has several manager-like roles, responsibilities, and powers. Two of the key differences between a supervisor and a manager are the supervisor does not typically have "hire and fire" authority, and he supervisor does not have budget authority.

Lacking "hire and fire" authority means that a supervisor may not recruit the employees working in the supervisor's group nor does the supervisor have the authority to terminate an employee. The supervisor may participate in the hiring process as part of interviewing and assessing candidates, but the actual hiring authority rests in the hands of a Human Resource Manager. The supervisor may recommend to management that a particular employee be terminated and the supervisor may be the one who documents the behaviors leading to the recommendation but the actual firing authority rests in the hands of a manager.

Lacking budget authority means that a supervisor is provided a budget developed by management within which constraints the supervisor is expected to provide a productive environment for the employees of the supervisor's work group. A supervisor will usually have the authority to make purchases within specified limits. A supervisor is also given the power to approve work hours and other payroll issues. Normally, budget affecting requests such as travel will require not only the supervisor's approval but the approval of one or more layers of management.

Friday, 11 May 2012

Domestic duck


Ducks have been farmed for thousands of years, possibly starting in Southeast Asia. They are not as popular as the chicken, because chickens have much more white lean meat and are easier to keep confined, making the total price much lower for chicken meat, whereas duck is comparatively expensive and, while popular in the haute cuisine, appears less frequently in mass market food industry and restaurants in the lower price range.
Ducks are farmed for their meat, eggs, and down. A minority of ducks are also kept for foie gras production. In Vietnam, their blood is used in a food called tiết canh. Their eggs are blue-green to white depending on the breed.

Ducks can be kept free range, in cages, in barns, or in batteries. To be healthy, ducks should be allowed access to water, though battery ducks are often denied this. They should be fed a grain and insect diet. It is a popular misconception that ducks should be fed bread; bread has limited nutritional value and can be deadly when fed to developing ducklings. Ducks should be monitored for avian influenza, as they are especially prone to infection with the dangerous H5N1 strain.

The females of many breeds of domestic ducks are unreliable at sitting their eggs and raising their young. Notable exceptions include the Rouen Duck and especially the Muscovy Duck. It has been a custom on farms for centuries to put duck eggs under a broody hen for hatching; nowadays incubators are often used. However, young ducklings rely on their mother for a supply of preen oil to make them waterproof, and a chicken hen does not make as much preen oil as a female duck; and an incubator makes none. Once the duckling grows its own feathers it will produce preen oil from the sebaceous gland near the base of its tail.

Saturday, 6 May 2006

The Who, The What and The Why


The Who

I was elected to the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors in 2003 to represent the Sugarland Run District. I am a one of six Republicans on that Board. My father was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from West Virginia back in the early 1980's which got me interested in politics and public service at a very early age.

Most of my bio is on my website - www.mickstaton.com, so I will not go into any more of the details here.

The What

There are so many things going on in Loudoun County right now that it can be hard to keep up with them all. Many of these issues are also pretty complicated, taking more than a sound byte or a single quote in the local paper to explain them all.

This site is my attempt to communicate with my constituents and the citizens of Loudoun County in a quick and easy format. There will be a wide array of topics that will be posted here. We will talk about taxes, politics, and of course the most controversial, volatile subject that has gripped Loudoun County for the last fifteen years or more...growth.

The Why

Before I began my run for the VA 33rd Senate Seat in a Special election, I had never really paid attention to blogs. The next thing I knew my name was plastered all over them and I started following some of the blogs that cover Northern Virginia, and met some of the local bloggers. I guess one of the things that surprised me is how many people were reading them, and how effective they could be in getting information out.

I have also become increasingly frustrated over the one-sided media in Loudoun County and Northern Virginia. I cannot tell you how many times I have had conversations with reporters for the local papers or for the Washington Post, spent hours with them describing issues with them in detail, mainly dealing with growth, detailing fact after fact about the issue, and then watch them totally ignore everything I have said and write an article that is biased and slanted.

So this site will be my opportunity to give people the facts about these issues without the spin and restructuring of the issues by a media that seems more interested in forwarding an agenda than reporting the facts. I will also be giving you my positions on these many issues in more detail than I ever could in any other forum.

So begins my latest experiment in communication and constituent contact. I hope it works out well, and I hope it is able to generate a healthy discussion about the issues that are discussed here.